BullBar..Is it really necessary for Overlanding

Bullbars, roof racks, suspensions and other accessories relating to vehicle performance
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Re: BullBar..Is it really necessary for Overlanding

Post by Clem » 13 Mar 2018 13:05

Goats.

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Re: BullBar..Is it really necessary for Overlanding

Post by offroadbiker » 13 Mar 2018 13:09

Kangaroos.
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Re: BullBar..Is it really necessary for Overlanding

Post by Clem » 13 Mar 2018 13:24

ra, on a serious note, if you overland a lot, there may come a time when you find yourself travelling at dusk or in the early evening (or God forbid, late at night) in areas where there are little or no fences. It's quite possible that you'll run into a quadruped of any number of possible descriptions. It may be because you don't see them or they simply move into your path. The bulbar with any luck should save your cooling system - and possibly more - from damage that immobilizes your car. There's a reason Australians also call them 'roo bars. There's obviously a limit though to what it can save you from. Outside of that it has some other practical uses as well, such as winch and light mounting and can be useful for pushing things out the way and the like. Whether its essential is a matter of one's view.
Last edited by Clem on 13 Mar 2018 17:02, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: BullBar..Is it really necessary for Overlanding

Post by Peter Connan » 13 Mar 2018 14:24

A bull bar is primarily an overlanding accessory, rather than a trail accessory. To my mind, it needs to protect the radiator and lights, primarily from accidents with animals and guineafowl. But few of the current commercial products will help with guineafowl.

Whether or not you need it is, as already said, a personal question.

But I do believe it can be done for a lot less than 70kg. My own one is only about 15kg heavier than the standard steel bumper for the Y60.
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Re: BullBar..Is it really necessary for Overlanding

Post by hugh » 13 Mar 2018 15:32

I had a few situations where I had to drive through obstacles, I don't think the standard bumper would have survived, so it would have needed replacement anyway :)

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Re: BullBar..Is it really necessary for Overlanding

Post by Clem » 13 Mar 2018 17:04

I think there may be some trail benefits, like improved approach angles. (?)

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Re: BullBar..Is it really necessary for Overlanding

Post by Peter Connan » 13 Mar 2018 17:22

That is true, and yet I have basically never seen anybody struggle with approach angle on a trail.

Breakover and departure angles plenty, but not approach...

I am not saying there aren't advantages for trail driving (or even for city driving), I just think it's greatest advantages lie in an overlanding application. Unless you consider those new-fangled bars that don't have any protection bars.
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Re: BullBar..Is it really necessary for Overlanding

Post by Alex Roux » 13 Mar 2018 17:31

ra_01 wrote:
13 Mar 2018 08:21
Hello All,

As sub says; do I really need to replace the standard with a steel bullbar (ARB/TJM etc.). Car already has a descent approach/departure angle. I am trying to keep the vehicle as standard as possible and avoid any complications that may occur due to loading up of vehicle with these accessories.

BB's are heavy (may be over 70kg's), this add's up a lot of weight in the front. Which means I may have to upgrade the suspension as well.

I am not into 4X4 sports. So I will only using my Patrol for overloading purposes (Traveling in Africa).

Thanks in advance.
I am not convinced it is necessary for overlanding. Bumps with animals rarely happen in day time. Driving at night or even dusk should in any event be avoided.
The larger quadrupeds will kill you once the animal is pushed over the bonnet (with or without the bullbar). While the smaller ones tend to be trampled underneath the car. I've had the unfortunate experience of killing a steenbokkie with my plat kar in day time, with almost zero damage to the plastic bumper. So the safety measure of having a bull-bar for overlanding is in my view overrated.
Also heavier and worse aerodynamics - Consumption worse. Also less power mass ratio - every bit counts when driving dunes.
And the trandemark bullbars like ARB are super expensive. Around 25k for a new one on the facelift models.

I consider it valuable in trail driving. Not only better approach angles (although not all bumper designs are better than the tupperware), but the damage on a hit is more manageable than the plastic.
Skilpad & Shortie

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Re: BullBar..Is it really necessary for Overlanding

Post by graham1 » 13 Mar 2018 18:12

Alex Roux wrote:
13 Mar 2018 17:31
Around 25k for a new one on the facelift models.
I got a quote from megaworld the other day for an ARB for the pre-facelift (I wanted to claim for a new one from insurance after the taxi incident) - R35k! :surprised:

Insurance would have laughed in my face so I left it.

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Re: BullBar..Is it really necessary for Overlanding

Post by SJC » 13 Mar 2018 19:15

BZT bars from summit4x4 are a lot cheaper... about 12k afaik :oldtimer:

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