Bushwinch...

Bullbars, roof racks, suspensions and other accessories relating to vehicle performance
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Bushwinch...

Post by hugejp » 18 May 2017 14:03

http://www.bushwinch.com.au

What do you think of this boys??
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Re: Bushwinch...

Post by SCUBA Patrol » 18 May 2017 14:18

oppas vir die side shaft afdraai!!! :wink:

Was altyd as kind vir my nice om die ooms in hule Landies met die hub-winch te sien, en gewonder hoe dit werk as daar nie 'n diff lock is nie? en wonder vandag nog :confused:
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Re: Bushwinch...

Post by Michael » 18 May 2017 14:52

Jip, have spoken about this somewhere on the forum before.
I would like to have one as you don't have to drive with a very heavy winch on your front bumper every day and just take it with when you might need it.
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Re: Bushwinch...

Post by Clem » 18 May 2017 15:14

I have a set for a Land Rover which I have used "in anger". They do work but…

You cannot drive around with them fitted to the vehicle – there is too much risk of them hitting things and damage being caused.
They are a hassle to carry around in the load bay, et cetera. You also need to carry the ropes, cables or straps (depending on the particular design).
You need specific wheel nuts to be able to use them – your normal wheel nuts do not work.
You have to place them so as to pull in a straight line – that means you have to carry large stakes (usually 1 m long pieces of angle iron) which you can hammer into the ground. To clarify, you cannot use a single anchor point for two wheels – that almost guarantees the problem that I refer to further below. You need to have the anchor point for each wheel at a point that will enable the rope (or whatever it is) to wind up straight on the drum.
You obviously also need to carry a sizeable hammer to knock the stakes into hard ground or whatever the situation is.
There is a risk of winding the cable, strap or whatever it is around the inside of the wheel (thus the axle) and causing damage (I know, I have done it) and then often you have to cut it away because it is so tightly wound, there is no other way of getting it loose...

It works and it can work well but on the whole, from my perspective, the theory is better than the practice.

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Re: Bushwinch...

Post by Peter Connan » 19 May 2017 05:06

Also, while it is relatively easy to mount on steelies, it is much more difficult on mags.

I don't like those extended nuts shown in the picture. I think there is a high possibility of shearing off all your wheel studs. And then you really have your finger in a tight spot...
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Re: Bushwinch...

Post by davidvdm » 19 May 2017 08:11

Design it so that it "clips" into the steel rim pattern so that you don't need to use those long wheel nuts. Secondly, attach eyes/loops to the outer edge of your bull bar and rear bumper and run the rope through the eyes. That will guide the rope from nearly any angle to align with the wheels.

Diff lock is not needed. As soon as the slack has taken off the rope, the spinning wheel will have resistance and power is transferred to the other wheel.

Problems I see is when you started getting traction and the rope does not wind up fast enough onto the hubs.The wheels need to be spinning for the winch to work. Now you start running over your rope. My luck, I dismantle the entire thing and I need it to work 3 meters further down the trail.

But I like the possibility of winch forward or backward. I would in fact, rather always fit the hubs to the rear wheels, and use them to do the pulling. Personal feel is that the rear diff is stronger. Then you just need to guide the ropes through the eyes forward or backward.

I have a set of 10" trailer rims I have laying on side with the idea of building something like this. It may be a total disaster, but I have to try it out for myself. I think it is way lighter than a normal winch, and I think I can get it set up to be used both forward and backward.

The alternative would be to mount a winch both front and rear (very heavy), or have a removable winch that can be mounted front or rear of the car. Then you find yourself carrying around a winch with big "bracketry" in the rear of the vehicle.

I think this bush winch has its merits, especially for some of us that can't afford the real deal. I also think it is better than my makeshift recovery method of wrapping tie down straps around the tires that are attached to an anchor. To keep them lined up and pull at the same time is a nightmare. And when that strap comes off to the inside of the tire, you stand a good chance of damaging brake lines.
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Re: Bushwinch...

Post by Clem » 19 May 2017 12:28

Two additional observations, for what they are worth:

If you look at some of the old military Series land Rovers, you will see that they have hubs built into their rear wheels precisely to use this type of extraction method. In that case, cables with an eye or a lug on the end were used, the eye or lug going over or through a notch in the edge of the hub.

The one great advantage of this extraction method is that, provided your anchor point is secure, you have the full power of the engine applying the torque of the low range transmission to extract the vehicle. Leaving aside the use of multiple snatch blocks, there is probably no other setup that will give your vehicle as much ability to get out of a "deeply bogged" situation such as when it is lying on its chassis rails in black cotton soil. Extracting a loaded vehicle with an ordinary winch and even with other recovery vehicles in such a situation is not always easy.

The military of course probably liked it mainly because it was cheap....

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